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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes the BRZ isn't AWD but that doesn't mean we can't be proud to own a Subaru.

Who knows maybe the BRZ will one day be all wheel drive.


This year marks the 40th anniversary of the debut of the Subaru’s symmetrical All-Wheel Drive (AWD) vehicles.

During the past 40 years, Subaru has continued to be a pioneer of passenger AWD vehicles, according to Subaru Canada. In fact, the total production of Subaru AWD vehicles has reached 11,782,812 units (as of January 31, 2012). This is approximately 55.7 per cent of total vehicle sales for Subaru.

Subaru’s AWD system provides traction by distributing engine torque to all four wheels in a balanced manner. With the combination of Subaru symmetrical full-time AWD and Subaru’s horizontally opposed SUBARU BOXER engine, the whole powertrain is mounted with side-to-side symmetry and the transmission sits back from the front axle within the wheelbase. This layout optimizes the longitudinal-transverse weight balance, bringing stable traction on a multitude of road surfaces and driving conditions.

Through continuous research and development over the past 40 years, Subaru has refined its AWD technologies from a basic technology capable of rough road driveability to the advanced engineering available today, added the vehicle maker.

Read the rest at http://www.carpages.ca/blog/2012/02/14/subaru-commemorates-40th-anniversary-of-awd/


Back in 1972 in Japan, Fuji Heavy Industries and its Subaru car brand launched their first passenger vehicle equipped with all-wheel drive. Little did they know that four decades later, the system employed by the Leone Estate Van 4WD would largely define the brand and the majority of its models.

All-wheel drive back then was a rudimentary technology. But even so, it was highly effective in providing much needed traction in a variety of environments and climates. Together with Subaru’s now-iconic flat-type engines, all-wheel drive dramatically improved grip in performance situations as well.
Fast forward 40 years and some 11.8 million (11,782,812 units as of January 31,2012, to be precise) all-wheel drive-equipped Subarus have rolled off its many production lines around the globe. Naturally, the drivetrain has evolved over the years and is now called Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive.


Nearly every vehicle (minus some JDM-spec kei-cars, trucks, and the rear-wheel drive BRZ) employs one of four basic variations of S-AWD. Throughout the decades, we’ve learned to love them all, and for that, we say Happy Birthday to Subaru’s effective all-wheel drive.

Here’s a brief breakdown of Subaru’s most current AWD setups:

- VTD-AWD or Variable Torque Distribution All-Wheel Drive

Meant for “sporty” vehicles, this setup utilizes a center differential that’s married to an electronically-controlled hydraulic multi-clutch limited-slip differential. In normal conditions, torque is split 45/55-percent front/rear, but can vary to 50/50.



- Active Torque Split All-Wheel Drive

Meant for models that emphasis fuel economy rather than performance, this front-wheel drive biased setup electronically controls a Multi-Plate Transfer case (MP-T) to vary torque in real time. In normal conditions, torque is split 60/40.



- Viscous Center Differential All-Wheel Drive

Meant for models equipped with manual gearboxes, the setup employs a torque-sensitive bevel gear-type center differential and viscous limited-slip differential. Normally, torque gets distributed at an even 50/50 split, but can react quickly to changing grip levels and manage slip accordingly.


- Multi-Mode Driver’s Control Center Differential (DCCD)

Meant for serious performance rides (i.e. STI models), the configuration combines a mechanical torque-sensing mechanical limited-slip differential and an electronically-controlled limited-slip differential. Mixing the two allows for near instantaneous torque and power distribution (thanks to the mechanical LSD) and a wider range of predictable behavior (thanks to the electronic LSD and its pre-programmed Gravel, Tarmac, and Snow modes). Normal driving means torque is distributed at a rear-biased 41/59 level.



Subaru will have a celebratory display at next month’s Geneva Motor Show in Switzerland, so stay tuned for more S-AWD goodness.

Read more: http://wot.motortrend.com/subaru-ce...-wheel-drive-system-169063.html#ixzz1mSXNYtOf
If you live in a cold climate and your all-wheel-drive (AWD) car provides you with good traction during the winter months -- or you live in some other type of place and it gives you great grip all year around -- you should tip your hat to Subaru, which introduced its first AWD vehicle 40 years ago.


While the Japanese automaker wasn’t the first to include it on cars, the brand has become synonymous with AWD since it’s been included on over half of the 12 million vehicles Subaru’s has sold worldwide since the debut of the Subaru Leone Estate Van 4WD (pictured at left) in Japan in 1972.



AWD has helped drivers keep their cars rubber-side down over the years by distributing and balancing engine power to all four wheels. Subaru’s combining of Symmetrical AWD (S-AWD) and a horizontally opposed “boxer” engine optimizes weight balance to provide stable traction on various road surfaces and in a wide range of driving conditions. The technology and the brand have also become favorites of “boy racers” and WRC fans worldwide due to stability at high speeds and crisps cornering and responsiveness (that, and because Subaru vehicles typically offer good value).



Subaru’s parent company, Fuji Heavy Industries, has refined AWD over 40 years, taking it from a technology that was initially designed to help smooth rough-road driving to now being the poster vehicle for regions like New England and the Pacific Northwest, where stickiness in rain, snow and other mucky conditions is essential. The latest evolution in Subaru AWD technology is a four-wheel traction-management system that the automaker uses in the development of front-wheel drive and rear-wheel-drive vehicles. The latter has been put to good use in Subaru’s first rear-wheel-drive sports coupe, the BRZ.


So Happy Birthday Subaru Leone Estate Van 4WD, and thanks for all you've done.

Read more @ http://editorial.autos.msn.com/blogs/autosblogpost.aspx?post=e437d286-8f01-4595-9cd8-9ee224a1dbc8
 

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It would be cool to have an AWD coupe, but I don't think it will happen with the BRZ. I could be wrong, maybe down the road Subaru will up the power on the FA20 boxer engine and make it AWD or RWD with FWD assist.

Subaru's AWD systems are some of the best yet. Subaru's AWD system complete with a serious power plant makes for a crazy ride aka WRX STI!

STI in action:

 

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It would be cool to have an AWD coupe, but I don't think it will happen with the BRZ. I could be wrong, maybe down the road Subaru will up the power on the FA20 boxer engine and make it AWD or RWD with FWD assist.

Subaru's AWD systems are some of the best yet. Subaru's AWD system complete with a serious power plant makes for a crazy ride aka WRX STI!

STI in action:

It's interesting because the STI's AWD system, even with the DCCD is really basic. The center diff just changes lockup, not torque direction. And the front and rear diffs are just mechanical LSDs. So when it's matched against another AWD system that's made for racing, it really puts things in a new light. Nissan's trick system in the GTRs and Mitsubishi's system with more electronics than the space shuttle have far more tech and dynamic control than Subaru's ever had. And yet, Subaru consistently competes with them.

The thing is, those fancy AWD systems do a great job of managing grip for the driver, but they work independently of the driver. What happens when the driver and the AWD system disagree? Since the computers can't react to the driver at an intimate level, the driver needs to adapt to the AWD system. That's not all that bad if the AWD system is very good at its job, but it's kind of like wagging the dog by the tail.

Subaru's system, because it's mostly mechanical, and symmetrical, has something that every racecar driver values: predictability. Predictability brings confidence, and confidence is essential for driving fast.

I love new technology as much as the next guy, possibly even more. But there's a point where it can get in the way. That's kind of the point of the BRZ/FR-S. Simple, pure, predictable, and ultimately.. fun. :)

EDIT: LOL.. just watched the video after posting, and watched the STI lose. Foot in mouth. I'd put the loss at about half the driver's fault and half the car's setup. The STI's driver wouldn't commit to the throttle and went in way too hot into the corners. Ah well.
 

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The mechanical LSD is something you can predict and know whats it doing. Evo just floor it and go , but the GTR, still amazes by the amount of grip it has with the trick system.

Subaru's AWD system is still i think the best in all conditions and just simple and easy to use, DCCD, is pretty basic i agree thats why people love subaru's awd system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There is a sense of purity to a mechanical LSD for traction but an electronic system is more accurate in the end. The R35 AWD system is a gem. The problem with using a electronic differential and traction control system is that the fate of the handling is at the hands of the engineer who programs that differential. And we all know that could go all wrong. A mechanical LSD is much more simple. The driver controls the throttle and that throttle control gives direct input to the wheels. Apart from the driver being bad, nothing else can get in the way.

But a well designed electronic differential can do wonders. For example the GTR. Things like launch control, traction control, brake assist. Electronic suspension controls.

Cool stuff.

But that aint the road that the BRZ is going to go down. It's mean to be a fun to drive pure drivers car. It does what the driver wants.
 

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Mechanical LSD is best for all of us, but not all of us will adoptable to the system, Ie GTR AWD system its isnt a tru AWD system is a electrnoic torque sensing system, in all fairness's they've been using it since time, with their older cars calling it HICAS! and what not. All their previous years GTR had it, but it was never a true awd system.


As for as evo's goes its pure electronics, thats why people love the subaru AWD system its mechanical the LSD's talk to you the car talks to you and is a tru 50/50 split or 40/6o how ever you want to set your DCCD torque settings haha


the BRZ wont get any of this just a pure RWD experiences!
 
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